Crisis Line for Teens – Volunteer Support for Youth

Heidi Ruud General Blog

Our crisis line for teens is available 24/7/365.

Having volunteered at Ozone House for more than five years, I can safely say that Ozone House’s services are second to none and meet a ton of different needs. From free counseling, to housing programs, to programming for new moms there seems to be something for everyone– and all of these programs are equally important. But one service that provides a critical connection to these resources is Ozone House’s crisis line for teens which I’ve had the tremendously rewarding experience of volunteering on for the past five and a half years.

The crisis line is available to anyone, anywhere 24/7/365. If you need help there is always someone there. This service is so important, because it ensures that anyone can get support anywhere, anytime, for any issue.

Crisis line volunteers go through a rigorous 40 hour training and on-shift observational period before hitting the phones and are available to talk about anything from family conflict to homelessness to suicide. Fielding these types of calls is incredibly rewarding. The volunteers who man the crisis line are top notch and are able to connect callers with resources both Ozone House sponsored and external.  They serve as a supportive adult and provide empathy as a means to foster connections.

Callers who may be eligible for Ozone House services will be scheduled for an intake appointment where our licensed and highly trained intake coordinator will evaluate the young person’s situation and help decide which Ozone House programs are most appropriate. For those not eligible for Ozone House services, the crisis line staff is still available to listen, help, and surface resources that may be appropriate for that individual. No matter what the situation, our crisis line is here to help.

If you or a loved one are experiencing a crisis, or just need to talk, please do not hesitate to give us a call at 734-662-2222 day or night, any time.

Guest Blogger: Joanna Gross